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Black Walnut Hull BLACK WALNUT HULL

Botanical:  Juglans nigra
Family:   Juglandaceae (walnut)
Other common names:  Walnut, Greek Nut, Carya, Jupiter's Nut

Rich in vitamin C and other important nutrients, Black Walnut Hull is an exceptional laxative that relieves constipation and promotes bowel regularity.  It is also thought to lower blood pressure and cholesterol   levels, as well as burn off fatty materials and toxins in the blood.   Black Walnut Hull is often used to expel internal parasites, including ringworms, pinworms and tapeworms, and its antiviral qualities may even do away with troublesome warts!

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein by Herbal Extracts Plus is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

History:
The Walnut tree is a large, handsome, deciduous hardwood with a rough bark that sometimes exceeds one hundred feet in height. There are fifteen species of Walnut growing worldwide in the dry, temperate zones of Asia, Europe and North and South America.  Six species are native to the United States, and the Black Walnut is among them, growing in the eastern states and up through Canada.  Black Walnut is one of the best-known, largest, and most valuable native hardwoods, but it is not plentiful.  It does, however, grow rapidly in mixed forests and rich, moist, well-drained soil, such as found in valleys.  Certain plants are sensitive to the roots and leaves of Black Walnuts, which exude a distinctive odor when bruised, and will not grow under or near them.  Walnut is a highly ornamental tree and is often planted for roadside shade and shelterbelts.  It is cultivated for commercial walnut production in Europe and the United States, where it is used for culinary and medicinal purposes, and its beautiful, figured wood is made into fine paneling, salad bowels and used in cabinet making.  Walnut has been used in herbal medicine for thousands of years, with the Roman naturalist, Pliny, mentioning it in the first century A.D.   Its botanical species, Juglans, is derived from the Latin reference to the god, Jupiter, and glans, meaning "nut" or "walnut."   In the Golden Age, when men lived on acorns, the gods dined on walnuts, thus providing us with another common name, Jupiter's Nut.  The English name is partly Teutonic in origin, with the Germans calling it wallnuss.  The seventeenth-century herbalist, Nicholas Culpeper, prescribed Walnut to draw poisonous venom from snakebites and spider bites.  Native Americans used the Black Walnut Hull for the very same purpose we use it today - as an extremely effective laxative.  Long before vitamins and minerals were discovered, herbalists used Black Walnut both externally and internally for easing scrofula, ulcers, wounds, rickets, scurvy and as a gargle; and Russian military hospitals also used Walnut as a cleansing and quick healing medication for wounds and ulcers.  Walnut is a popular food and is included in candy, ice cream and cake flavoring.  The outside pulp of the nut is used as a dye (it was actually the main source of brown hair dye until early in the twentieth century).  In the last century, Black Walnut Hull was known as one of the "most mild and efficacious laxatives" available, and it was listed in the United States Pharmacopœia from 1820 through 1905.  The leaves, husks, inner bark and nuts have remained a valuable treatment in herbal medicine to this day, where it is now used clinically for many kinds of skin diseases and as a laxative.  Some of the constituents in Black Walnut include beta-carotene, B-vitamins and vitamin C, fatty acids (linoleic, oleic, linolenic, palmitic), calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, lysine, protein, limonene, sulfur, iodine, phosphorus, quercetin, potassium, selenium, silicon, zinc, tannin and juglone (5 hydroxy-1, 4-napthoquinone).

Beneficial Uses:
Black Walnut Hull is highly valued as a very effective herbal laxative and used to relieve constipation and to promote bowel regularity.  It is strongly purgative, but at the same time is considered safe.

As a vermifuge, Black Walnut Hull cleanses the body of many types of parasites.  It expels intestinal parasites during the normal course of laxative-induced cleansing of the body; and the hulls' high tannin and juglone content is believed to oxygenate the blood and kill parasites.  Black Walnut Hull is particularly effective against pinworm, tapeworm and ringworm infestation.

Black Walnut Hull is said to be a fine antiviral that is effective in removing warts, which are growths caused by viruses.  It may also be helpful in cases of herpes virus and cold sores.

As an antifungal, Black Walnut Hull is thought to be an excellent treatment for fungal infection, relieving leprosy-type skin diseases, athlete's foot and Candida albicans.  Topically, a salve of Black Walnut has helped to alleviate nail fungus.

Black Walnut Hull is considered an antiseptic with antibacterial agents in the essential oil (juglone) and a high organic iodine content that combats infectious micro-organisms and bacterial infection.   It has been used to combat malaria, syphilis, boils, acne and other bacterial infections.

Black Walnut Hull may help to lower blood pressure and serum cholesterol levels and is believed to burn up toxins and fatty materials while balancing blood sugar levels.  This activity may help to ward off heart disease.

The tannins in Black Walnut Hull (and Leaves) possess an astringent quality that is thought to shrink the sweat glands and reduce excessive sweating.  The herb is said to help control menorrhagia, the excessive loss of blood during periods.  It is also used to control diarrhea.

Black Walnut Hull is considered a tonic that aids digestion and the intestinal system.  It helps to relieve colic, heartburn and flatulence.  As a cholagogue, Black Walnut stimulates the flow of bile into the intestines and is thought to ease bilious colic and pain in the spleen.

Based on Turkish folk medicine, the husks or leaves of Walnut species may be beneficial for internal use in the treatment of glandular disorders including thyroid problems.

Contraindications:
Currently, there are no major warnings or contraindications with the use of Black Walnut Hull Herbal Supplement, but because of the lack of research, little is known about the potential side effects of Black Walnut Hulls or Leaves.  However, allergy to tree nuts is common, and allergic reactions to Walnuts have taken place.  People who are allergic to other nuts, especially pecans, may also react to Walnuts or Walnut products.  Because there is a high tannin content in Black Walnut, it should not be used on a continual basis.

 
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